Tag Archives: web platform

On blogging: sex, drugs and George Orwell

fireworksToday is the one year anniversary of my blog.  In that year my daughter left home for Honduras and returned (in one piece), albeit speaking Spanish. I started the 5:2 diet and didn’t stop. Although I’ve recently found  6:1 (1 day fast, 6 eating as normal including treats) is enough to maintain ideal weight, improved and younger looking skin (so my husband remarked at dinner, although what he actually said was);

“Are you wearing much make-up?”

“No not much, why?”

“Your face looks different, smooth… umm….”

“Younger?”

“Yes. That’s it. I didn’t want to say because then you would think I thought you looked old before.”

“Did I?”

– aswell as keeping the ankylosing spondylitis under control, with minimum medication.

I wrote a novel ‘The Replacement Wife’, but have yet to secure an agent (I will not give up). A short story got short-listed in Mslexia. My son studied for and passed his A-levels (and is off to Warwick to study philosophy). We got a new dog called Fred, a rescue poodle mix (cockapooish) from Cyprus, who is cute, devilish and has a crock (as in ugly plastic shoe) fetish. And summer arrived and stayed (sort of).

I salute you.
I salute you.

But what of my blog? Who visited and why in the past year?

Nearly 12,000 people have dropped by. A lot of them repeat visitors (thank you).

Average visits per month has grown to over 1000.

The main search terms revolve around sex, drugs and George Orwell.

george-orwell-quotes-sayings-lies-truth-famousGeorge Orwell led 98 people here, not sure what they made of it.

Agnus Castus brings hundreds of people to my blog and dominates the top of the search terms as well as the majority of search categories. Quite rightly. It works.agnus castus flower

Lord John Shayler, who opened a strip club in Ampthill, which is no longer a strip club, came third in most searched term. Probably disgruntled Ampthillieans, the ones in the incongruous image below, posing outside the contested strip club for a charity calendar.

ampthill

And finally, 380 comments!! Thank you so much. One of the best things about a blog is getting a comment on a post.

I didn’t know if I would sustain my blog. I didn’t know what I would blog about. I didn’t know if anyone would read it.

I have sustained it. I still don’t really know what I blog about. But you do read it. Thank you.

Here’s to another year of sex, drugs and George Orwell!

Advertisements

A review: My top ten for 2013

Time to review my list for 2013, one month in:

  1. Get an agent- well, I jumped. MS is sent.
  2. Get a publisher – depends on 1.
  3. Fast twice a week – yup, still doing it. Still feel great. Husband starts it tomorrow.
  4. Meditate regularly- not once. I really must start doing it again. Make time.
  5. Enjoy the moment (live in the present) – always trying, but would help if I meditated.
  6. Worry less (see no. 5) – nuff said.
  7. Read more books – reading two at once, currently. Spent a great train journey, immersed in Sadie Jones, Small Wars.
  8. Write more (instead of procrastinating on the internet) – well I’ve sent the MS and my friend and I are challenging ourselves to write something new each month and put it in our shared dropbox.
  9. Keep blogging- love my blog.
  10. Accept change is part of being alive and embrace it – I’m getting on a plane to Honduras! And looking forward to it.

A list: My top ten for 2013

  1. Get an agent
  2. Get a publisher
  3. Fast twice a week
  4. Meditate regularly
  5. Enjoy the moment (live in the present)
  6. Worry less (see no. 5)
  7. Read more books
  8. Write more (instead of procrastinating on the internet)
  9. Keep blogging
  10. Accept change is part of being alive and embrace it

What’s your top ten for 2013? Please share.

Starting blogs is a habit of mine

me and Archie

I know I started one (or three) somewhere with lots of links and things, but can I find it or them? Nope. Though I have found, I only make up just less than one page on a google search. Not a great web presence then, which brings me back to why I have started yet another blog. You see the problem is this: I need a web presence to create a platform for my writing – literary agents apparently google you, when you send a submission (covering letter and first 3 chapters of your novel, for non-writers reading this) – but (and there are two):

In between working full time as a teacher and running the home and everything else known to man and woman, as well as writing short stories and a novel or four, keeping up with writing groups on and off line, reading blogs about writing and publishing, entering competitions and preparing submissions, and reading lots and lots of books, where do I find the time to write a weekly blog posts, with links and pictures and other exciting things?

Well, here I am anyway – avidly reading blogs on blogging for writers, like this one from Ann R. Allen’s blog, which is why I have used my name in the title, ( it should also aid me finding it, though I hope this time not to lose it in the first place); and this ‘get started’ guide from Jane Friedman.

Yet already I am getting cold feet.

Which brings me to my second ‘but’:

Why would anyone want to read what I have to say (says the aspiring author)? I don’t know what I think about most things most of the time. There are fundamental things I am sure about, hurting other people, physically and psychologically is wrong (excluding consensual acts of S&M); the only person who can make you happy is you; no one is all bad, or all good; and, every pudding should be accompanied by clotted cream. But beyond that, I am a bit airy-fairy, prone to seeing the other side of the argument.

Most recently, I have found myself wavering around the whole benefit debate. I am proud my country has a safety net. As has been said by many, including Gandhi and Pope John Paul II; a civilised society is measured by how it treats its most vulnerable members. I have often used the argument that benefit fraud is  a very low incidence (despite what the papers say) and any system that protects the weak will be abused by the minority (and should not be reason not to have one). But, I can’t deny the fact that there are some families in the second and third generation of career unemployment, collecting their ‘wages’  from the state, with no compunction to get a job or an education; their lives lurching from one self-inflicted crisis to another.

The state protects many vulnerable people, but in doing so, infantilizes and institutionalizes some. These kidults (having children of their own) are locked in an egocentric world, where their needs are paramount and those of others, not so much ignored, but not perceived.

So I don’t know what to think? And I don’t know what the answer is? If we don’t have benefits then the most vulnerable will suffer. But if we do, then we sustain, and possibly create, an underclass.

If you have a view on this, then please pile in. I have feeling a number of my posts will end, not with an answer, but a question and a plea for help to unravel what it is I think, I think.

Until next time. Au revoir.