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Agnus Castus: Tincture – another option?

I recently received an email from Alison Cullen a Nutritional Therapist who works for A.Vogel. She recommends the tincture as an effective way to achieve relief from PMT. I have often thought about trying tincture, but find the dosage (drops) unfathomable when compared to the standardised extract used in trials.

Alison has helpfully provided an explanation, which actually makes sense:

20 drops of A.Vogel Agnus castus tincture contains 54.2mg of dried fruit, or 542mg of extract (which is the fruit once it’s been macerated in a water/alcohol mix and extracted). So if you take a daily dose of 40 drops you get 108mg of dried fruit or 1,084mg of extract.

We make our own tinctures, so we can answer any queries as to the process, should they arise.

On the packaging of the licensed product (which hasn’t come out yet – licence came through last week), the SPC of which I attach, the strength is given as 895mg of extract in 33 drops, which is just a ratio of the figure for 20 or 40 drops. The MHRA make us put it this way because they require the strength to be equivalent to the amount in 1ml, and for our Agnus castus tincture this is 33 drops.

Now from my research, based on trials, 20mg or 200mg dried fruit is the dose that has found to be most effective, however, I also accept that the tincture may work differently from tablets (possibly absorbed more easily?) The reviews from the A.Vogel site do seem to endorse Alison’s claim that this dosage is effective, even though it is around 40% lower than the recommended.

More importantly, for the practitioners who use this product, myself included, and the women who take them, this is the dose that we find to work! I started using the A.Vogel range because of the tincture format, which is very easily absorbed, and now work with the company partly because I like their products so much and appreciate their methods and principles, but mostly because they work. The range was made by a practitioner, Alfred Vogel, so it is pretty practical.

I have always been uncomfortable with the fact that I can only recommend one supplier. So with the dosage explained the tincture is a viable alternative and may suit some women better. However, price-wise, the tincture is £9.15 for around one month of herb, whereas Prime Health tablets are £11.75 for six months.

I am not endorsing either product and I receive no perks or payment from either company, but I do want women who visit this blog to have options. So now we have at least two choices of where to buy and I am still planning on growing my own (once a house move is sorted).

Anyone else found a supply of Agnus Castus in the UK that works for them?

Do share and do please keep telling other women, doctors, consultants and anyone that will listen about Agnus Castus. As Alison points out the new restrictions imposed by legislation are already making some herbs unavailable and with it the knowledge of them.

I was reading about the difficulty of finding a suitable Agnus castus product on your blog, and your position is very much reflected by women who are contacting us currently, searching for a product they can take with some degree of confidence.

The problem has occurred previously with Black Cohosh, no worthwhile dose of which now exists on the market, sad to say.

The news for Agnus castus is slightly better, because it is part of the A.Vogel range and we have managed to avoid losing it (as we did Black Cohosh) and even get a licence, without having to compromise on the dose. We have the same dose on our (very newly) licensed product as we had previous to the licence, which is a relief, as it is a dose that I have found to work very well in my clinic.

How can it be progress when future generations of women will have no knowledge that the answer to their health lies in their hands and the natural world around them. That is why I am also urging Dr Nick Panay, Consultant Gynaecologist, to get a trial up and running on AC so that it can become a prescribable treatment for PMT. See this post and if you feel so compelled drop Dr Nick an email or letter in support of his attempts to obtain funding for a trial.

If we can get one herb on the recommended list for GP’s then it could open the floodgates for others. When I visit my doctor I want to be recommended the best treatment for me (be that a herb or a lab produced drug), rather than the best drug (in terms of profit) for the Pharmaceutical industry.

Help me. I can’t do this alone 🙂