Four for writers: How I write a novel (and for anyone who wants to know what I look like without make-up on)

I admit this is a bit of a lazy post this week, but only because I have been spending every spare minute of the day completing the second draft of my novel (the one the agent wants to see). And in penance, I am letting you see me without make-up on, and believe me, it is not pretty.

Sorry you had to see this
Sorry you had to see this

The first draft is rough (see picture). I just write, without censoring my thoughts, or worrying about POV. I write 2000 words a day, every day, until around six weeks later I have 100,000 words. I show no-one this draft.

Amazing what a bit (lot) of foundation can do
Amazing what a bit (lot) of foundation can do

I then begin all over again. Using bits of the first draft, but often rewriting scenes from a different POV to the one I originally chose, and getting rid of the ‘tell’ – usually backstory, so vital to the writer when constructing the novel from scratch, but boring to the reader. It is only once I have a second draft that I can see the full shape of the story. Or using the make-up analogy, foundation is on and the worst cracks and crevices are smoothed away.

The second draft is the first time I show anyone the story (I would never leave the house without at least foundation on). Time to call in all those favours from review groups and writer friends.

Getting there.
Getting there.

Once I have all the feedback in, comes draft three. Strengthening character motivations and themes. It might also involve writing ‘out’ or ‘in’ a character, and even changing the plot. Back to the make-up analogy, still very much reconstructive – creating cheekbones I don’t have and eyelashes I can only dream about.

I feel like me again.
I feel like me again.

Draft four. Close reading of every sentence, often starting from the back and working forward, as it is easier to see each sentence on its own this way. The important thing to do here, is get rid of any lingering cliches or stupid phrasing, and check dialogue sounds natural. Or in make-up terminology, applying eye-shadow, eyeliner and filling in my pale eyebrows, which almost disappear on the outer edge.

20121013_122108

And finally, draft five – Now I can focus on the little things, like typos or missing words and checking the whole thing reads smoothly, and there aren’t any continuity errors. I use a text to speech software programme (this one is free), correcting as I go. Time for lipstick and hair.

Ta da!
Ta da!

Now I am ready to submit! Or in make-up terms; this is as good as it is going get.

Luckily my writing can improve further, even if I can’t!

How do you do it? Write a novel I mean, not apply your make-up. Please share.

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4 thoughts on “Four for writers: How I write a novel (and for anyone who wants to know what I look like without make-up on)”

  1. Beautiful analogy, Juliet. I’m much more muddled in both regards, my make-up application skills having atrophied around age 16 blending blue with purple eyeshadow, or was it green?

  2. Thank you Anne, I can’t quite believe vain old me has posted a picture of myself without make-up on, but it has actually been quite liberating and the world hasn’t ended. Nothing wrong with a bit of blending 🙂

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